10 things you didn’t know about the Marquis De Mores

The Marquis De Mores, whose real name was Antoine Amedee-Marie-Vincent-Amat Manca de Vallombrosa, came to Little Missouri County in March of 1883. His master plan for the area was to build a meat packing plant and then ship his processed beef on refrigerated cars to the east coast; essentially cutting out the middle men. Through this, and many of his other exploits, the Marquis left and indelible impression on the history of this area. Here are ten things you may not know about the Marquis De Mores.

0042-078 Marquis de Mores on horseback with rifle Medora DT 1886

10. The Marquis was 24 years old when he came to what was then known as Little Missouri County; this was roughly the same time as when Theodore Roosevelt came to the area.

9. He spent two years at St. Cyr, the French Military Academy. St. Cyr is the equivalent of West Point.

8. He married his wife Medora in Cannes France, on February 15,  1882.

7. The meat packing plant that the Marquis built cost $250,000. In 2013 that would be $6,155,344.21

6. He started the Medora to Deadwood stagecoach freight service in 1884.

5. The cowboys of Little Missouri county came to resent the Marquis not because of his wealth, but because he had the audacity to fence in his land. This fencing limited the freedom to move about that people of the area had been used to.

4. He was almost in a duel with Theodore Roosevelt.

3. He was born during the peak of Napoleon the Third’s rule.

2. Medora is named after his wife.

1. The Marquis and some of his assistants were in a gunfight with three hunters who where furious with the Marquis for a litany of reasons. When the gun smoke settled, one of the hunters, Riley Luffsey, was dead. The surviving hunters charged the Marquis with the killing. The Marquis was eventually acquitted.

For more information on the Marquis, his wife and what the rest of his life was like, visit the Chateau De Mores during you next visit to Medora!

3 Comments

  1. Claudia Jacobson Claudia Jacobson
    August 7, 2014    

    Very interesting, thanks!

  2. January 1, 2015    

    I really apeatcirpe free, succinct, reliable data like this.

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